What? It’s Friday???

One of the important elements of blogging is to post regularly and consistently. Decide how many times a week or month you want to post and then live up to that commitment. Makes sense, right? I thought so! So I decided that it wasn’t realistic to think I would post every day, or even every…

Clark Hinkley – Civil War Soldier

He entered as a Private in the 182 NY Infantry, in the B Company. The regiment joined with the Van Buren Light Infantry and the Calcium Light Infantry. They served at and near our nation’s capital in the Army of the Potomac, Cooper’s Brigade.

Pieces of 8 Generations!

1956 Anita P Strong   1927 – 1994 George W Perry   1928 – Edith M Hinkley 1907 – 1978 Marie P Dion         1900 – 1953 George W Perry   1902 – 1979 Cora M Bartley                   1892 -1964 Edward Hinkley 1888 –     …

Finding George

It’s been quite the struggle looking for military records for my father, George Wesley Perry, Jr.  I have information for uncles, cousins, grandfathers, great grandfathers, great great grandfathers. But for Dad? Nada, zip, zilch. There’s a website that can be used for searching EVERYTHING about military service and even that comes up with the “Nothing…

Baileytown Cemetery

In the process of researching for the blog, I’ve had opportunities to visit with some family members and have some really cool conversations. Part of one conversation was a brief statement my mom made: “Look into the name Bailey. The Baileys owned Bear Mountain and they are back there somewhere”. Then she gave me a…

Wm H Bartley: Civil War Soldier

William H Bartley is my maternal 2nd great grandfather. His parents were William H. Bartley and Sarah Horner. He was born in 1831, probably in Newburgh, N.Y and died in 1880. William’s wife was Almina Austin and they had 5 children: Charles, Cyrus, Amanda, William P., and J. Simms. The names of the spouse and…

Original Glue – Cora Bartley Hinkley

For me, my Grandma Hinkley was the first experience I had with “glue”. She was an amazingly warm person with a true magnetic personality. She was absolutely meant to be a grandma, and I’m so grateful that she was mine! As a small child I used to LOVE to go to her house to play…

Some Really Cool Photos!

I don’t know who all of these folks are, though I do know many. If you would like to share regarding who you know, please comment on this post! We would love to include names on all photos!      

Is that Desire, Dislare, or Diure?

One of the resources I use most often in gathering information about my roots is word of mouth – my mother, aunts and uncles, cousins, siblings. What’s funny about this is that most of the things I’m told have at least three versions. One example is my Grandpa Hinkley’s middle name. Some say it was…

Digging Up Bones

Sitting at mom’s little dining room table chatting about ancestry and where our roots are and she clearly knows much more than I thought she might. I ask her what she knows about her father’s military service and she tells me that he never really shared much with the family about that – not unusual…

Edward Street Hinkley

On July 15, 1919, Ed married my family’s glue, Cora Mae Bartley (this was her 17th birthday!). Together they had ten children: Charles Clark, Kathleen, Laura Ann, Jesse Sims, Edith Mae, Edwina Cora, Alice Virginia, Richard Edward, Nancy Frances, and David Lester. Two of their children, Charles and Alice, survived less than one year.

George Wesley Perry

On Christmas Eve of 1926 he married Philomene Marie Dion in Norwich, Connecticut, my very beautiful grandmother! They had five children: Alfred Richard, George Wesley, Jr. (my dad), Ruth May, Margaret Beatrice, and Emma Lorraine.